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/r/Damnthatsinteresting

70.5k94%

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all 3354 comments

V3rr15a

5.4k points

2 months ago

V3rr15a

5.4k points

2 months ago

For a second I thought it was a before and after picture of human expansion.

MeatloafTheDog

1.5k points

2 months ago

Growing up in Phoenix there was a lot of desert just 5 miles north of where I lived. Now its suburbs all the way up to the Juvie. The development in Phoenix is fast and I wouldn't be surprised if it's been developed up to Anthem in 5-10 years

Gingerbeer86

444 points

2 months ago

Father in law has a house in goodyear. In just a couple years between visits the amount of developed area was basically quadrupled.

blowthatglass

183 points

2 months ago

I live in goodyear. It's insane how quickly it has grown out here. Now the next furthest out down, buckeye, is growing super quick.

hoxxxxx

50 points

2 months ago

hoxxxxx

50 points

2 months ago

why

Maleficent-Present36

168 points

2 months ago

Everybody’s trying to get in there before they run out of water

king-cobra69

78 points

2 months ago

When all those people do get in there, they will run out of water. Hope they are not planting grass and trees-just catii.

Greedy-Avocado6785

59 points

2 months ago

https://azpbs.org/horizon/2022/06/saudi-water-deal-threatening-water-supply-in-phoenix/ Apparently, farmers from other countries like Saudi Arabia are buying up land that taps into the underground aquifers, draining millions of gallons of water for highly water intensive crops like alfalfa to ship to back to their cattle farms

king-cobra69

16 points

2 months ago

Can we rent land in Saudi Arabi for its oil content? Why are the AZ people allowing this? If they come crying about water shortage, they should look to themselves.

rAbBITwILdeBBB

38 points

2 months ago

They pay about 86 thousand dollars a year. Some reports show that the water could be worth up to three to four million dollars a year that they are putting on the field every year.

This sounds like something that the Republicans would be all over trying to stop. I wonder how this was even allowed to happen.

envymatters

14 points

2 months ago

Read Cadillac Desert if you're interested in the mismanagement of water in the Western states.

king-cobra69

21 points

2 months ago

They have some crazy republicans down there. One is still protesting her election loss. Even if they did know, it is all about money and currying Saudi favor. trumps are into Saudis big time: a golf tournament, multimillion/billion dollar business deals. I can imagine what would/will happen to us if trump gets in office again.

[deleted]

19 points

2 months ago

I mean....

Abracadaniel95

149 points

2 months ago

I cannot fathom why so many people would move to the desert just as the negative effects of climate change start ramping up. It's gonna be unbearable in a decade and they're already rationing water.

ToebeansInc

55 points

2 months ago

Because it’s still relatively cheap. Water has been an issue here for a long time, but only recently has come to the forefront. They still water the numerous golf courses, so I’m not sure how we’re rationing water.

atothez

44 points

2 months ago

atothez

44 points

2 months ago

Golf courses in Arizona are almost exclusively watered using wastewater effluent. The effluent is pretty clean, but it can’t be directly served as tap water. Wastewater effluent is used to fill a lot of the man-made lakes in town. Golf courses are often watered by pumping from the lakes. It may seem weird that there are so many golf courses and lakes in the desert, but it’s only possible because there are so many people with showers, toilets, washing machines, etc. However, tap water is generally used to fill swimming pools and water residential lawns, which is why water conservation policies focus on reducing landscape watering. It’s pretty wasteful to water lawns and landscaping with treated, fluoridated, chlorinated drinkable water, mostly due to the cost and energy required to treat it. A much higher volume of water is used for crop irrigation, but for historical and practical reasons, agriculture gets first dibs on the water.

ToebeansInc

6 points

2 months ago

The golf courses here mostly use groundwater or municipal water. Last year there was a proposal by the Arizona Department of Water Resources to reduce the amount of ground water golf courses use by around 3%. It’s not toilets and showers that keep courses green, it’s the underground aquifers the town was built on.

Effluent water here cannot be used in places where contact with the skin is likely. It also cannot be used for edible crop irrigation.

twoshovels

30 points

2 months ago

It seems to be near everywhere. Everyone wants away from the snow. Same thing here in Fla. What was once swamp land is now homes.

probably-theasshole

61 points

2 months ago

Still a swamp... Just has homes that are going to be destroyed every 10-20 years on top of it now.

twoshovels

17 points

2 months ago

I’m in construction. I was there working when these vast neighborhoods were going up. Every single one is a handy man special in 5 years. I also have seen the water table at roughly 12 inch’s down. After a good hard rain some of them homes are floating.

probably-theasshole

15 points

2 months ago

And you know they're people closing on a house tomorrow for 100% more than what it sold for 3 years ago. Smh it's crazy how ignorant people are to how trash these mega builders homes are.

Tinder4Boomers

33 points

2 months ago

People are so braindead they would rather sign up to live in a literal desert or in space that will be underwater than be cold

vzvv

42 points

2 months ago

vzvv

42 points

2 months ago

Makes no sense to me. I love the snow and having a crap ton of water around. Living in a desert is my personal nightmare.

Prickly_ninja

23 points

2 months ago

The desert is a nice place to VISIT. I have no interest in staying for good.

vzvv

9 points

2 months ago

vzvv

9 points

2 months ago

I’d love to visit. In the winter maybe, I’m never going to a desert in the summer again by choice.

Maleficent_Top_5217

7 points

2 months ago

Heat decreases my quality of life. I need cold, green, bodies of water to enjoy on an occasional warm day.

OldManRiff

118 points

2 months ago

Lived in Avondale (right next to Goodyear) from 2001-2011. We went from being on the outskirts to being in the middle of town, & we didn’t move. You’d have to go past Buckeye to be on the outskirts in the west valley now.

TornadosArentReal

222 points

2 months ago

Makes you wonder how they get enough water to sustain that what with all the droughts and what not

Szechwan

373 points

2 months ago

Szechwan

373 points

2 months ago

Haha sustain?

Sustainability is not part of the equation here.

throwaway4206983

205 points

2 months ago

"Build it and they will... figure it out later" or whatever the saying is

IowaJL

121 points

2 months ago

IowaJL

121 points

2 months ago

The greatness of America: kicking the can down the road for the next people to figure it out.

lilbithippie

30 points

2 months ago

Politicians should be looking out for this, but they only see the next election cycle

myaltduh

79 points

2 months ago

Developers build, sell, and gtfo once they’ve been paid. Homeowners will be left holding the bag.

SnarkHuntr

63 points

2 months ago

And, eventually, taxpayers everywhere else in the country.

"How could we possibly have foreseen that all these new homes and swimming pools in an area that's already using water faster than it is returned could have been a problem? This is an unforeseeable natural disaster and we deserve a bailout."

king-cobra69

8 points

2 months ago

One article purposes the fact that pool water evaporates and helps humidify the air. Also firemen can use the water to put out fires. I did not make this up. lol

SnarkHuntr

6 points

2 months ago

And clearcutting "opens up the forest floor for sunlight"....

Whyamipostingonhere

16 points

2 months ago

Are we pretending these homeowners are blind now? Like they can’t see they are surrounded by desert?

They know already.

myaltduh

11 points

2 months ago

People get lured in by the promise that the inevitable won’t happen anytime soon. It’s the same with beach houses on the Gulf Coast, houses in fire-prone scrubland in California, and anywhere else where water is clearly not going to be indefinitely available.

Most people tend to not think too hard about long term risks when purchasing a home, especially if they have a tight budget.

Purcee

128 points

2 months ago

Purcee

128 points

2 months ago

Just got back from a trip there. The number of FOUNTAINS in certain parts of the city will never cease to amaze me. Not just little ones, but larges series of mini waterfalls cascading into man made lakes. WTH are these people thinking, you live in a desert.

youstolemyname

34 points

2 months ago

Calms the nerves

GreenAdler17

79 points

2 months ago

Almost all of those are run using reclaimed water. Aka, purified poop water. Heck, even my cities grass areas are watered with the reclaimed water and signs state not to drink it or play in it for that very reason.

[deleted]

40 points

2 months ago

Water should be purified and reused though.

aggieemily2013

36 points

2 months ago

I agree with this, although my third grade field trip to the water treatment facility cannot be erased from the mind.

I wanna drink reused purified water -- I just wish I didn't see the process.

hump-me-horizantal

30 points

2 months ago

This person knows

dec7td

113 points

2 months ago

dec7td

113 points

2 months ago

There's plenty of water if we stop using it to grow crops that don't have any business being in the desert. Not sure humanity could survive without lettuce in the winter though.

CallieReA

38 points

2 months ago

Yup. AZ resident here. We gotta kick the Saudi Alfala farmers out ASAP.

ZeBrownRanger

4 points

2 months ago

Dude brah person. I live in New Mexico. The amount of alfalfa farming that goes on in desert landscapes is insane. It blows my mind. It's so well subsidized that's it's hard not to grow it.

My uncle had acreage but didn't want to grow alfalfa. He was high way facing so he built storage units. He told me that was the only thing more profitable than alfalfa.

a_dodo_stole_my_baby

50 points

2 months ago

You should check out what The Netherlands are capable of doing!

https://wapo.st/3i2dP2t

"They have a system whereby enough crops to supply 100,000 residents daily with nearly half a pound of fresh vegetables each can be grown in an area no larger than two football fields."

unresolved-madness

8 points

2 months ago

Crops grow very well in the desert if they have enough water. Lots of solar energy for growth.

flotsamisaword

5 points

2 months ago

People have been growing crops in they Phoenix area for a thousand years

SuperBottit

11 points

2 months ago

Arizona has stacked away all their excess water into the aquifer.

However, there isn't enough and sketch government officials that get kickbacks are overallocating to developers and... well they're in for a fun surprise. I moved away because this issue will become more real pretty soon. North of Fountain Hills in the Rio Verde area they're out of water and some developers got all the land east of the 202 to Queen Valley with no water rights yet plans to build 2 million homes... lol

jdcnosse1988

11 points

2 months ago

They're currently building houses in Rio Verde without a confirmed permanent water source.

OldManRiff

44 points

2 months ago

Agriculture is the real water user in AZ.

--redacted--

41 points

2 months ago

Especially with us giving it away to Saudi Arabia

Cunniculus

11 points

2 months ago

While that is true it's not clear that the 500 golf courses and constantly flowing water features are a real necessity. Hard to justify asking the Midwest for water when the courses are green in the 120 degree summer

bigwavedave000

17 points

2 months ago

Saudi Arabia owns massive farms in Arizona, where they pay extremely low water rates, then send the hay and alfalfa back to the Kingdom.

Ive head the local farmers are not really happy about it.

is-this-now

24 points

2 months ago*

It is not sustainable. Colorado river no longer runs to Gulf of California like it used to. Lake Mead is lowest ever since Hoover Dam was built. There’s a city N of Phoenix where several hundred people will no longer have running water on Jan 1. Until they find someone who can truck it in for them.

Edit: Gulf of Cali

CallieReA

36 points

2 months ago

Also - that city is out of water because they refused to incorporate so they did not have to pay taxes. Those people would not be out of water if they incorporated. I just don’t want this story to paint a mad max picture cause we’re nowhere near that

kb4000

7 points

2 months ago

kb4000

7 points

2 months ago

Gulf of California*

NumbingTheVoid

25 points

2 months ago

Yep, Peoria was all Cotton fields for miles, then they built the stadium and they're almost all gone. Im amazed you can drive almost all the way to Lake Pleasant and it's all covered by development, especially with the expansion of the 303.

[deleted]

8 points

2 months ago

I grew up on the end of the street at Greenway and the 303, and there used to be car accidents there all the time because people would blow the stop sign on Greenway crossing what was then a two lane highway that was the 303. Going there now is wild.

BlamingBuddha

6 points

2 months ago

Just moved up to this area, cept a few miles north of Greenway (off the 303). Couldn't imagine Even here, it went from all desert to all neighborhoods in just a few years

Mattna-da

23 points

2 months ago

Miles and miles of subdivided suburban tract homes behind miles and miles of stucco walls. Id be concerned what happens to that population when it’s no longer economically feasible to air condition the whole region.

SnarkHuntr

8 points

2 months ago

You should read "The Water Knife" by Paolo Bacigalupi.

Climate refugees, that's what they'll be.

SuperBottit

5 points

2 months ago

Have you played Fallout 3?

Ok_Watercress5719

17 points

2 months ago

It's like that in Ohio too. They just keep digging up anything with sitting dirt... Before you blink... There's houses and stores there 🤷🏽‍♀️

whichonesp1nk

13 points

2 months ago

I grew up in Surprise and then moved away. I return every 2-3 years for a visit and it’s shocking how different it is each time, especially the freeway progress.

brando56894

5 points

2 months ago

Was it a... Surprise every time you returned?

djluminol

12 points

2 months ago

There's all kind of houses out by Lake Pleasant now.

Back in the 50's my grandma took a picture of Scottsdale Road when a portion of it was still a dirt road near Tempe. The city is probably 3 times the size it was when I was kid. Let alone when she was still young. All these people coming here are about to get a real shock when they find out we're running out of water.

FireFaux1775

11 points

2 months ago

Bro, I've been camping out there for 2 years in the winter.. IN TWO YEARS Phoenix is just eating sand dude it's insane. Entire neighborhoods complete with churches, colleges, you name it, poof.

There isn't any water, but that isn'g stopping anybody.

Double_Distribution8

9 points

2 months ago

I bet $1000 they moved the headstones but not the bodies.

[deleted]

9 points

2 months ago

I lived in Surprise in the early to mid 2000s, near the 303 and Bell. It's fucking bananas visiting that area today, it's honestly hard to come to terms with the fact that if I ever feel nostalgia for that time in my life, even being there doesn't feel the same.

Isthisworking2000

6 points

2 months ago

I would be. They’re getting closer and closer to extreme water shortages.

firstcoastrider

6 points

2 months ago

I lived in Cave Creek as a kid from 02-07. Haven’t been back since but I have looked at Google maps, fuck me bud. There is no desert anymore. It’s subdivision after subdivision. Truly depressing and haunting.

Albuwhatwhat

14 points

2 months ago

It’s bad. There’s already huge water issues and Arizona is way over its water rights on the Colorado river and they aren’t just trying to maintain their population, they’re expanding at an explosive rate. Just total unchecked free market and they’re going to fuck everyone (and every animal) who lives in the southwest just to make some money for people who are mostly already rich. It’s amoral.

I was just there this last weekend and the amount of green lawns and golf courses and small man made lakes and ponds I saw there made me want to puke as someone from New Mexico. They’re wasting water like nobody else. Good thing our water is upstream from theirs.

TinyRick6

383 points

2 months ago

TinyRick6

383 points

2 months ago

It kind of is though

Andychives

60 points

2 months ago

Not really since the salt river Indian reservation is almost always over-grazed to dust. Both are developed just in different ways.

CantHitachiSpot

31 points

2 months ago

I mean it's in Phoenix. It's gonna be dust no matter how many cows you don't have on it

Deivore

19 points

2 months ago

Deivore

19 points

2 months ago

Not only that but it no doubt looked totally different before the 30s dustbowl when we obliterated half the plant life of the southwest.

yagovip

705 points

2 months ago

yagovip

705 points

2 months ago

Nah man this is the cities skylines building border

Chrimmm

98 points

2 months ago

Chrimmm

98 points

2 months ago

Only 9 tiles on console is BS man

who717

42 points

2 months ago

who717

42 points

2 months ago

Press F for our console brethren

NotSure2505

4.7k points

2 months ago*

That’s Scottsdale Ranch. I used to own one of the houses right on the border. Coyotes and bobcats for days. We’d also see wild mustangs from time to time.

The Salt river tribe police would patrol that land, if they caught you they’d take whatever vehicle you had.

Here’s a video of what it looks like on the ground near there.

https://youtu.be/whGzAQl5DOY

Bro_tosynthesis

1.7k points

2 months ago

My friend always told me tribal police would shoot us with rock salt if they caught us riding bikes on the rez but I don't think it was true, definitely believed it at the time though.

International-Play29

403 points

2 months ago

I woulda believed that shit as a kid too lmao

ghdana

599 points

2 months ago

ghdana

599 points

2 months ago

You can legally ride on the Arizona Canals on reservation land. I am not sure about other parts, but I regularly take my gravel bike through the land up to Scottsdale or over at Fort McDowell.

I find it kinda funny that even with their land in Fort McDowell and all of the farming, all of the guys I come along on the small canals by the farms are all Mexican workers.

I've also taken the back way around Red Mountain on my bike which has gates, but when I encounter any members of the Tribe they just literally look the other way and pretend they don't see me. Totally ignore any waving.

I'm just passing through and not hurting anyone so they just let it go. It would be different if I was on a dirt bike ripping up the road and creating a sound nuisance.

Donkey__Balls

223 points

2 months ago

You can legally ride on the Arizona Canals on reservation land.

Yeah I don’t think that’s true. It’s just one of those things that isn’t enforced and then a lot of word-of-mouth feedback loop confirming itself.

ghdana

145 points

2 months ago

ghdana

145 points

2 months ago

It is 100% true, the Maricopa Trail follows the Arizona Canal and you have legal access to it.

wtseeks

142 points

2 months ago

wtseeks

142 points

2 months ago

Were the houses on the border more desirable or less desirable?

NotSure2505

325 points

2 months ago

You tell me. This was the backyard looking south. That's Camelback mountain in the distance, you can also see it in the original post photo, upper left, looks like a camel sitting down.

moparornocar

126 points

2 months ago

id take that view over the back/front yards of other houses for sure. thanks for sharing, beautiful sunset.

UniversityNo257

141 points

2 months ago

I did a job on a reservation about 20 years ago, they bought Dell computers and paid us to integrate them into their network for a school district. I flew into Phoenix and drove 5 hours to the Arizona Utah border, thru monument Valley. One of the most amazing things I've ever experienced, absolutely beautiful, with the exception of a racial incident in flagstaff.

I've often considered taking that ride again with my children, maybe loop back to Vegas, take them to a show, then back home.

89141

64 points

2 months ago

89141

64 points

2 months ago

I’ve driven that. Also kayaked by Mexican Hat on the Colorado. That whole area is insane.

Funny story, I was driving some Norwegian’s through there and we came across some guys on horses, wearing cowboy hats, with ropes, full-on real cowboy’s who were gathering loose cattle that escaped from a downed fence. I was quite odd to them seeing American Indians dressed as stereotypical cowboys — on the reservation.

getittogethersirius

15 points

2 months ago*

Yeah I once explained to an exchange student who was curious about Native Americans, that they probably see them all the time around town just wearing jeans and t-shirts like everyone else. They were shocked. I got the sense that their impression was that 100% of them still live 100% traditionally.

sciguy52

33 points

2 months ago

Yeah in these parts there is a reason you wear that stuff believe me. Not to look like a cowboy, just to not get fried by the sun on your bald spot on your head and chaps for the thorns. Everything seems to have thorns around here and you brush up against mesquite it will tear you up. Cowboy boots for the poisonous snakes. Didn't realize till I moved here the reasons people dressed like cowboys. I need to get some cowboy boots myself, the Copperheads are everywhere. At least Rattlesnakes give you a warning.

deafballboy

50 points

2 months ago

The stereotypical American cowboy is inspired by vaqueros.

Multitrak

8 points

2 months ago

Awesome view! Arizona has the most beautiful sunsets. I was there around the whole State for 14 days and really didn't want to come back to Fl

ghdana

71 points

2 months ago

ghdana

71 points

2 months ago

They are more desirable because then you have 0 noise in your back yard from other humans or vehicles.

NotSure2505

62 points

2 months ago

Just coyotes literally every night, if you can imagine what a middle-school keg party would sound like, lots of whoops and yips.

Jwhitx

13 points

2 months ago

Jwhitx

13 points

2 months ago

I grew up in the deserts of wickenburg/wittman, left for the city and have not heard them since. I wouldn't mind a night back in the hassayampa lol

Spurnout

57 points

2 months ago

What happens if I ride a horse there? Are they going to take my horse?

forehandparkjob

82 points

2 months ago

Straight to jail.

booyah81

32 points

2 months ago

No trial, no nothing. You right to jail, right away.

Not_a_real_ghost

27 points

2 months ago

No horses? Believe it or not, jail.

NebraskanHeathen

122 points

2 months ago

Just had a bobcat in our yard a few days ago ..

j3b3di3_

53 points

2 months ago

A BOBCAT!!!

EyesOpenedWide31

32 points

2 months ago

“Oh my god it’s a bobcat!!!”

Im_ready_hbu

24 points

2 months ago

WATCH OUT IMA SHOOT THAT FUCKER!!

guyinnoho

16 points

2 months ago

Bit ma wife!!

Malor

13 points

2 months ago

Malor

13 points

2 months ago

That's Robertcat to you, sir.

BathedInDeepFog

7 points

2 months ago

Mr. Goldthwait is my father’s name. Call me Bob.

the-finnish-guy

10 points

2 months ago

Not gonna lie, because I'm so uncultured I thought you were talking about wild sports cars driving around freely without drivers.

cosmiccharlie79

26 points

2 months ago

I’m out there all the time, what are you talking about? Taking your vehicle? Only issues I’ve ever had is feral dogs

MoarGhosts

1.4k points

2 months ago

MoarGhosts

1.4k points

2 months ago

I live in Scottsdale and we used to drive through the reservation to head up to our cabin. Not sure if that’s still allowed. It was always wild to me how there’s just nothing there on the reservation side.

[deleted]

125 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

125 points

2 months ago

Is it desirable to have a house near, or even backing up to the reservation like this? Like if you have a house that backs up to a state forest or something, that would be desirable. Would that be the same case here?

Or would it be undesirable to have your house back up to the reservation like this?

cbizzle187

181 points

2 months ago

Very desirable. I did a remodel on home that backs up to this. $200k extra just for the lot. Just about every morning you'd see wild horses on the reservation.

iso_mer

95 points

2 months ago

iso_mer

95 points

2 months ago

Yea I would much rather see the natural landscape out my back windows than another house.

PiratePinyata

29 points

2 months ago

Neither desirable nor undesirable from my experience in the valley. You can’t go on to rez property so it’s not like you can go for a Sunday hike. But nobody will probably ever build there

captainvontage801

965 points

2 months ago

There's really no incentive or point for there to be any development there. All these Indian reservations are on a government trust. So basically the dirt that the natives live on doesn't really belong to them. So there's no incentive to build. That's why you see old dilapidated buildings near Navajo Nation and a few other reservations. The natives aren't stupid. What's the point of building a nice house when you don't even own the land that you're building on? The only cushy job to have is to be on the tribal council. Cuz every month when the federal government sends that check, they're the ones that get to distribute it to everybody else. And of course it's totally riped with corruption. You got council members giving bigger checks to Mom, Dad, relatives, etc. Nepotism runs rampant. It's just all wrong and heartbreaking.

nantanlupancbq

805 points

2 months ago*

Native here. The US government does not send out checks to council to hand out to tribal members. Nepotism and corruption yes. Also, natives/tribal members from all reservations all over the US do pay taxes just like everyone else.

Edit: for a “to” before council

browsingnewisweird

367 points

2 months ago

of course it's totally riped with corruption

Rife.

captainvontage801

112 points

2 months ago

Thanks for the correction. That last comment was just one long angry rant

Gay-_-Jesus

45 points

2 months ago

It’s certainly fucked all around.

Smirkydarkdude

21 points

2 months ago

Also incorrect. There is a TON of development going on in that indian land. Just not in the particular section of the land in this picture. And I'm glad of it because I live on the other side of that line and woldn't really love a gigantic Casino on the other side of the fence. :) The development is all a lot closer to the highway up higher in the pic near the 101. A Casino, a Top Flight golf place, Butterfly Wonderland, one of those IFly places, a mall... lots and lots of commercial development. In addition all along the top left of that picture would be land that is used to grow cotton. The development continues all down the left side of the 101 for miles. https://ibb.co/vPmqXKt

ghost_406

30 points

2 months ago

Montana Native here, that's not really true here. What likely happened is the housing crisis sent developers on a building frenzy. They built tons of cheap houses in a short amount of time but can't build on the rez, because its the rez. So any farms on the white side got taken and sold to developers and the rez side stayed in control of whatever farmer is using it for grazing or whatever.

As for seeing dilapidated houses, It's not lack of motivation, its lack of resources. People move off-rez to work and don't return. The ones who stay have few jobs to pick from. That can change now that the tribes are getting proper cell and internet infrastructure.

battleop

96 points

2 months ago

Doing business on an Indian Reservation is a huge pain in the ass. I once had a T1 circuit that went to a bank on a reservation and their rules were ridiculous. They tried to block the install to begin with because we didn't employ anyone from the tribe in our company. We were over a thousand miles away so not employing someone specifically from that small tribe wasn't feasible. Then they decided that we couldn't let our tech do the install so we had to hire a tribe member even though he knew nothing about telecom. He just had to stand there and observe and get paid as much as a senior engineer. Any time there was a ticket that required remote hands we had to do this dog an pony show. This was some where in Kansas or Oklahoma if I remember correctly.

[deleted]

72 points

2 months ago

I will never work on an Indian reservation again. I didn’t even last a month. Non stop grievance complaints, disgusting accusations and nobody would talk with me on the reservation despite being there to help

UniversityNo257

23 points

2 months ago

As noted above I dis a job on a reservation. Migrating about 200 systems into their school system on the Arizona Utah border. I honestly had no issues. Well, other than not making a stop to grab alcohol prior to crossing into their territory. I'm sure there were outlets but I wasn't finding any. 3 days without a cold beer was crazy.

ofcourseIwantpickles

9 points

2 months ago

You are on crack, there is tons of commercial development on the Salt River Res with massively lucrative ground leases in perpetuity. There is limited residential development due to limited population of the tribe. This is a very wealthy tribe next to a very wealthy community, and the Navajo analogy doesn’t apply in the slightest. Your post is a great candidate r/confidentlyincorrect

True_Reception1834

46 points

2 months ago

What the fuck are you talking about? Where do I get my check? I can’t believe that hundreds of stupid motherfuckers actually believe what you just said.

Hopsblues

19 points

2 months ago

Not all reservations are the same. You just generalized a whole lot there. Not all tribal councils are corrupt. The land is not a trust, it belongs to the tribe and they can whatever they want with it. Most tribes try to work with local communities and governments to be good neighbors.

Mabarigroomer88

28 points

2 months ago

Exactly they also make the Natives go through the ringer just trying to build businesses on reservations. The process for someone on reservation land to get a business license etc. can take 5 years vs so a few months elsewhere. The government has set up reservations to fail. It’s just plain wrong.

Ttbacko

10 points

2 months ago

Ttbacko

10 points

2 months ago

Wasn’t the point of the reservations to preserve nature and the native way of life rather than bulldozing and developing it?

GuiltyEidolon

13 points

2 months ago

The original point was to round up natives to steal their land and make it easier to oppress them lmfao.

Ttbacko

5 points

2 months ago

You taken a US history course? We were doing that very well without the reservations.

Educational-Hawk3066

29 points

2 months ago

Jesus Christ. Not being from the states, I really know nothing about any of it. The more I learn, the sadder I feel.

Hopsblues

57 points

2 months ago

Be cautious what you read in this thread. It's full of a lot of mis-information, bigotry and myth. I'm a tribal member. Live off the res, but work on the res. Not all tribes are the same, there's a lot of comments here trying to make every tribe the same, one.

dueche

457 points

2 months ago

dueche

457 points

2 months ago

The title is misleading, it the salt river Pima Indian reservation or locally known as Pima reservation and there’s big box stores on the res with 99 year leases and a few casinos.

mazzicc

58 points

2 months ago

mazzicc

58 points

2 months ago

Much further south than where this picture is, yes, but even there, it’s a small pocket a mile or so onto the res, and then it looks just like this again.

pixbyeli

109 points

2 months ago

pixbyeli

109 points

2 months ago

While it's true that this is a section of the border between the pima indian community and Scottsdale, I feel like it could also be considered misleading. In most places it's not nearly this stark of a contrast. Many of the most popular tourist spots such as the aquarium, top golf, multiple casinos, etc and the 101 freeway run straight through tribal land. Also taking McKellips road to Mesa goes straight through as well so the edges of the indian community are practically integrated with the city of Scottsdale in many places. Most people won't even notice when they drive onto tribal land.

jdcnosse1988

10 points

2 months ago

Yep, even Scottsdale CC is on tribal land, technically.

chaseoes

22 points

2 months ago

That's why this part is interesting.

RocketMan_0815

570 points

2 months ago

whenever I see pictures like the one on the right, I hear the "little boxes" song.

DirtTraining3804

85 points

2 months ago

🎶And they all look just the same🎶

PriestessRedspyder

138 points

2 months ago

Ticky - tacky

col3manite

63 points

2 months ago

Tacky describes Scottsdale for sure.

PriestessRedspyder

12 points

2 months ago

Over priced tacky!

Leading_Manager_2277

46 points

2 months ago*

"Little Boxes" is a song written and composed by Malvina Reynolds in 1962, which became a hit for her friend Pete Seeger. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=-Cjk0zst3Cseeger in 1963, when he released his cover version." https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=-Cjk0zst3Cs

sixthreeandhung

21 points

2 months ago

Rise Against also covered this song and it’s really good!

LanceFree

7 points

2 months ago

I’m re-watching the series and at least through the second season, it’s someone different covering the song at the beginning of e1ch episode.

seeliger

45 points

2 months ago

weeds 👌

Capable_Weather4223

28 points

2 months ago

Looks like that bf2042 map. Crazy

Impressive-Leave7587

117 points

2 months ago

Rattlesnakes need a place to live, too.

Not_A_Weebalo

35 points

2 months ago

Phoenix is surrounded by mountains. 5 miles up from almost anywhere you can go hiking and run into rattlesnakes, not to mention they live in fields all over. Old yards and abandoned houses get full of them. They adapt well to human development.

k7baixo

19 points

2 months ago

k7baixo

19 points

2 months ago

We moved to a new development in Ahwatukee AZ in 1995. I soon became the designated rattlesnake remover. Never killed a single one, relocated them out into the desert away from the homes.

leavemealonegeez8

896 points

2 months ago

Wow, I always knew the government gave some of the least desirable land up for the reservations, but sharing a border with Scottsdale Arizona???

That’s some fucked up shit.

JaneGoodallVS

45 points

2 months ago

I took a Native American law class taught by a Native American professor in college. He said reservation land was poor farming land but not necessarily poor for mining.

iLiftHeavyThingsUp

63 points

2 months ago

You joke but it's actually one of the most desirable neighborhoods in the US.

Bismarck913

77 points

2 months ago

Brit here: Americans who live near Native American Reservations, how much do you interact with the population there? Do native Americans work jobs with you? Ever go to the same school? Hang out together?

mazzicc

18 points

2 months ago

mazzicc

18 points

2 months ago

It depends on if the natives want to work and go to school with the non-natives, and what businesses they allow to operate on the reservation.

I lived further south from this and worked at the Pavillions shopping center that had special rules because it was on land leased from the tribe. There were a handful of natives I worked with, and definitely a lot of shoppers because they got special tax rules.

I had a few native kids in my classes, but that was more because I was in one of the whiter schools. Even further south into the less affluent areas, there’s a decent number of natives in the public schools, but not really significant numbers. Those that go to the public schools tend to be in families that have moved off the reservation or are trying to, in my experience.

KenKaniff357

107 points

2 months ago

I was actually a teacher in South Scottsdale. It was a nice mix of kids. We'd definitely get kids come from the Rez. Just this past year, I remember waving the 8th graders off in a car parade made up of students and their families. A native girl was sitting in a convertible in her native American garb. She looked amazing.

persieri13

11 points

2 months ago

Grew up near a rez in a different state. It was similar to any other small town in the Midwest.

Many natives worked off the rez, a handful of other ethnicities worked on the rez (especially at the hospital and the school). They were in my high school’s conference so we played them in sports - I always thought it was really cool that they played a tribal anthem before games in place of the national anthem that is traditionally played. Kids would hang out with kids from other towns. Prevalent poverty was really the only characteristic that made the rez stand out from every other town in a 100-mile radius. Wouldn’t know it if you only went to the school, though. They got constant funding, had PHENOMENAL athletic facilities.

squid_dog

5 points

2 months ago

The past two years I’ve lived on a reservation in South Dakota, there we’re definitely more native spots I wouldn’t dare go to but there were also non natives living and owning business on the reservation. casinos were in every business it seemed. There were native schools but they also went to the town schools. My only friends were from the tribe and i would hang out with them frequently. It was a good time and I do miss living there. It was very poor and desolate though.

wingnutorbust

26 points

2 months ago

I lived a quarter mile from that reservation (on the other side of the picture shown).They went to my jr high and high school. They come into town to the grocery stores/restaurants. I would drive across the reservation to save time. Didn’t really interact with them too much.

Apptubrutae

4 points

2 months ago

There’s a similar situation in Albuquerque where the most expensive zip code bumps up against sandia pueblo land on the north and a national forest on the east.

There’s a big casino by the interstate and a state road through tribal land that brings you from the low point at the interstate back up to the foothills, about 1,200 feet of elevation gain.

It’s an absurdly beautiful drive either way, looking up to the mountains or down into the valley. New Mexico has relatively more integration with native American culture in general though.

[deleted]

22 points

2 months ago*

Reservation child here, we are often sent out to non-rez schools because there are none or they are bad. Otherwise we keep to our own, no one understands us and we get tired of all the incorrect assumptions and inconsiderate comments. Most of us feel like we have the better life even if we don’t have as many things. Most people in my tribe don’t interact unless you go to the museum or they are trying to sell you something.

Hillsy85

11 points

2 months ago

I thought this was a before and after

Anagatam

11 points

2 months ago

It is exactly that!

[deleted]

11 points

2 months ago

Not pictured: Top Golf, Casino Arizona, Talking Stick casino, medieval times, the aquarium, and Hobby lobby. All on the reservation.

impact4

9 points

2 months ago

Good for whoever is keeping that land' beautiful, that's a true gift to humanity

throwaway110906

8 points

2 months ago

It’d be beautiful to wake up if you lived on the border to just look out and see the vast expanse

wilhoitaz

50 points

2 months ago

Just a bit down Scottsdale Rd the Indians have a massive development-5 star hotel and Casino--Incredible Butterfly walk throughout-can spend 2 hours here alone, huge aquarium with whales and more--major advertiser for Phx Suns games Extreme prime real-estate- perhaps the prime market in the Us The Valley of the Sun--Phoenix, Scottsdale, Tempe, Glendale ( Cardinals stadium,--only a matter of how soon-will be the tech center of the country

eyesocketbubblegum

22 points

2 months ago

I grew up on this rez

sbwcwero

7 points

2 months ago*

What was it like? I’ve been in AZ since 2006, but I grew up in Florida, and was already an adult when I moved here. I live in Mesa now, and while I know quite a few natives, I don’t know what it was like for them growing up. Just as adults

savageoodham

8 points

2 months ago

Salt River Pima - Maricopa Indian Community (SRP-MIC) member here. This area is the northern most part of our reservation. Best crossroads to google would be: Via linda rd & 90th st, or just south of shea Blvd. The land is empty for two reason: 1. The land is owned by different community land owners, hard to get something built out that way without permission from hundreds of community members approval. 2. Our tribe has designated half our community wild reserve/ recreation area, this means nothing will be built here to preserve the natural beauty of the area.

Many of you are stating the casino and spring training facility. We do have our own casino (Talking stick resort) and spring training facility, those are built on the most western part of our reservation, which is designated our business district. This area also butts right up against scottsdale, Pima Rd. Is the main border there.

If you have any questions feel free to ask me.

TheChopDontStop

6 points

2 months ago

Today I’ve learned Reddit knows extremely little about the desert, Native land and peoples, and Phoenix, and loves making brash statements about something they’re clueless on. Way to be, y’all are embarrassing.

[deleted]

18 points

2 months ago

I lived in Phoenix until I was 24 and I don't ever remember seeing this. I fail.

Ihcend

18 points

2 months ago

Ihcend

18 points

2 months ago

It's not often you go on a helicopter and take a bird eyes view of the border between Scottsdale and the reservation. So you really didn't fail.

mazzicc

7 points

2 months ago

Look at a Timelapse of Phoenix in the last 30 years, it’s insane. Between the time I was in high school and now, it’s barely recognizable as the same town.

I know a family that used to live at the end of a 15 min drive on a dirt road when I was a kid, and now their house is basically in the middle of a subdivision like this.

I remember when the 101 was a north/south only freeway that stopped at Indian School Rd.

Perfect_Caramel4836

6 points

2 months ago

It's reserved for a reason.

Smirkydarkdude

30 points

2 months ago

This is is a bit spooky... my house is in that picture. It's one of the ones at the top of the picture where the roofs all turn reddish (clay tile). The resolution isn't quite there to see it clearly but it's in there. Cool.

macgruff

23 points

2 months ago

Y’all realize this is “a” section only, right? It wouldn’t be a very interesting photo if they show you the casinos and malls that sidle up against the very same borderline. They just took a photo where there is not a bunch of development… yet

Look up on Google Maps >> Salt River Pima–Maricopa Indian Community

Cy_Burnett

5 points

2 months ago

I find it mad how everyone living here ignores that their water supply will run out soon

Bulbous-Walrus

5 points

2 months ago

If you ever wanna lose faith in humanity, just read the comments on this post.

funnyfacemcgee

4 points

2 months ago

Ah what a beautiful natural landscape (left).

oncore2011

28 points

2 months ago

You missed the area where their casinos are. Like a mini Vegas.

TheApetrixHasYou

93 points

2 months ago

Holy hell. One half looks like a barren hell scape and the other looks like a nice desert environment.

Oldmanhulk1972

16 points

2 months ago

Typical Reddit: post shows a specific Arizona reservation and here come all the internet experts broad brushing all natives with their one encounter with a particular native person.

Dr-janitor1

4 points

2 months ago

I Would love to live right at the edge, nice view nothing in front of you! Looks awesome.

[deleted]

4 points

2 months ago

The house I grew up in is in this picture! :D

festygoer

4 points

2 months ago

Knew this would have been a shit show of a comment thread haha. Happy Native American Heritage Month…

Belisarius23

5 points

2 months ago

and not a supermarket or corner store in sight. Gotta admire american suburbia hell

bawlsinyojawls8

3 points

2 months ago

suburbia denied, love to see it

Mordacai_Alamak

4 points

2 months ago

I used to ride my motorcycle though the reservation a lot while sort of commuting. It is definitely nice to be able to go from city to rural immediately.

gumercindo1959

4 points

2 months ago

There’s a similar difference on the DR/Haiti border

drummin515

4 points

2 months ago

Kinda gross really.

TheGBZard

3 points

2 months ago

Minecraft biomes in a nutshell

Baconlord369

9 points

2 months ago*

My abuela used to live there. I miss her. She made great food.

Emotional_Dare5743

10 points

2 months ago

All I can think about is the water it must take to sustain that sub-division. Crazy!